official Sony screen

Includes but not limited to: SNES, Genesis, Sega CD, PlayStation 1, Nintendo 64, Dreamcast, Game Gear and I guess the Virtual Boy.

Moderator: Moderators

Post Reply
Guest

official Sony screen

Post by Guest » Tue Jul 13, 2004 3:26 pm

whats the most volts can you put into an official Sony screen, with out killing it....

User avatar
Link89
Posts: 593
Joined: Sun Jun 13, 2004 10:23 am
Contact:

Post by Link89 » Tue Jul 13, 2004 3:37 pm

It says that it needs about 7.5 volts so I wouldn't try to put more in. But it sounds like the Gamecube lcd should take 7.5 but takes 12 volts according to everyone. I don't think anyone has really tried to put more volts in then needed because it will probably get fried. Hope this helps a little

User avatar
gannon
Moderator
Posts: 6974
Joined: Sun Apr 04, 2004 4:48 pm
Location: Near that one big lake
Contact:

Post by gannon » Tue Jul 13, 2004 4:09 pm

sony lcd uses a 7805 so the input can be up to around 25V, but that's a big waste of energy. What I'd be more worried about is blowing the fuses that are before the 7805. I don't know what their max. is.

User avatar
xxxeagle
Posts: 951
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2004 6:37 pm
Location: In my house on my parents new computer. :)
Contact:

Post by xxxeagle » Thu Jul 22, 2004 7:39 pm

I wouldnt put more than 9.5 or 10 on it becuase it will probably fry it id just play it safe theres no point in ruining a screen to see if howa much volts it can take

User avatar
stereth
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2004 11:55 am
Location: WI
Contact:

Post by stereth » Thu Jul 22, 2004 8:37 pm

You won't blow any fuses with extra voltage. Since the voltage gets regulated off the top, the current draw remains constant as long as you're putting in at least ~7V.

But the screen, stock, draws 1A. Already you're dissipating (7.2V-5V)*1A=2.2W of power. At 10V, that's up to 5W.

Looking at the 7805 datasheet, a bare TO-220 is rated for 4W. Less in an enclosed space, more with a fan or heatsink. So in a small space, don't use more than about 8-9V; in the open, maybe up to 10V; with a fan, you could probably get away with 12V without damaging anything. (But at that point, you've nearly doubled the power consumption of the screen.)

User avatar
SpongeBuell
Senior Member
Posts: 5190
Joined: Wed Apr 07, 2004 10:52 am
Location: Colorado
Contact:

Post by SpongeBuell » Thu Jul 22, 2004 8:39 pm

Well, if you pump 50 volts into it, I'm sure you'd blow something, though that isn't too likely unless you short the florescent voltage increaser thing with something else.
Life of Brian wrote:
RYW wrote:RYW:

Rare
Yellow
Weasel
I'll be honest with you - I would have never guessed that.

User avatar
stereth
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2004 11:55 am
Location: WI
Contact:

Post by stereth » Thu Jul 22, 2004 9:35 pm

Some interesting things on the datasheet. I'm looking at this one. One chart shows voltage differential vs output current. Drawing 1A, you can only put about 35V into it. (35V is also the nominal max. I missed that one before.)

Still, the main issue is power dissipation. At 35V, you're making a 4W part dissipate 30W. Something's going to melt.

And you're wasting batteries.

If you want to put 12V into this thing, I suggest looking into DC-DC converters. You can get some 1A+ parts that are no more than an inch square.

Guest

Post by Guest » Fri Jul 23, 2004 1:36 pm

There is something I don't quite get, I didn't take any electronics courses so bare with me. My psone's power adapter only outputs 7.5 volts.

However, it powers both the PSone and the sony screen when plugged in. If the ps1 needs 7.2 volts, then how is it possible for the screen to even power on, since the PS1 is already taking so much of the power. I saw something on the board that looked kind of like wrapped copper coils, how many volts can it boost (assuming that is what it does)?

I'm a little confused.

User avatar
gannon
Moderator
Posts: 6974
Joined: Sun Apr 04, 2004 4:48 pm
Location: Near that one big lake
Contact:

Post by gannon » Fri Jul 23, 2004 2:01 pm

the coils that boost the voltage are for the backlight of the screen. Voltage doesn't decrease like that, it depends on the amperage rating of the power supply.

User avatar
stereth
Posts: 127
Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2004 11:55 am
Location: WI
Contact:

Post by stereth » Fri Jul 23, 2004 8:17 pm

Guest, when you hook up system + screen to the adaptor, the same voltage is applied to each. The required current increases, which is why a 3A adaptor came with your screen, as opposed to a 2A one with the PSOne.

The coils boost voltage to at least 800-1000 volts, probably more. The stock backlight needs that kind of voltage.

User avatar
Dramlin
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Jul 17, 2004 2:14 am

Post by Dramlin » Fri Jul 30, 2004 11:06 pm

Alright how about the least amount of volts put into it. Does anyone have it running on 7.2?

thanks

User avatar
gannon
Moderator
Posts: 6974
Joined: Sun Apr 04, 2004 4:48 pm
Location: Near that one big lake
Contact:

Post by gannon » Sat Jul 31, 2004 12:16 am

yeah, psone and screen both use a minimum of 7.2V

User avatar
Dramlin
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Jul 17, 2004 2:14 am

Post by Dramlin » Sat Jul 31, 2004 12:50 am

thanks again

Post Reply